Comprehensive Integrated Psychiatric Assessment of an adolescent

Comprehensive Integrated Psychiatric Assessment of an adolescent

What did the practitioner do well?

In the YMH Boston Vignette 4 YouTube Video, the therapist was professional by telling the teenager at the beginning of the session of the right of confidentiality and privacy unless he has suicidal or homicidal thoughts. This information built a good rapport and trust with the client which then enabled him to share his feelings. The adolescent may be worried about confidentiality, and clinicians can reassure them that approval will be requested from them before any detailed information is shared with parents, except situations involving danger to self or others (Price, 2017). The practitioner built a good rapport with the client by making good eye contact, trying to focus more on the client and not the parents, as well as asking him about his hobbies. Rapport is built by enabling patients to feel easiness during stressful situations. The practitioner also does a good job as he allows the client to explore his feelings. “When adolescents become able to cope with the controversial and problematic situations, anger affects self-perception because it is displayed in a situation where individuals are restrained or challenged” (Lok & Bademli, 2018). Moreover, the practitioner asked about his school and by asking him about what he liked doing after school.

In what areas can the practitioner improve?

The therapist needs improvement is communication because he did not introduce himself to the patient at the beginning of the video. In addition, the therapist was not firm with his statements as he agreed mostly with the client putting faults oh his mother. The client just wants someone to listen to him which explains why he praised his girlfriend because she listens to him. The practitioner failed to find out why the client thinks his mom is irritating. Moreover, the practitioner needs to improve on listening skills as a lot of time was spent taking notes during the interview which can be distracting for both the therapist and the patients. The practitioner could have politely asked the patient if it is okay for him to take notes during the session and explain the reason for that.

At this point in the clinical interview, do you have any compelling concerns? If so, what are they?

A very important compelling concern is to inquire if the client feels safe at home with his mother. In addition, medications being taken by the client and psychiatric history and, lastly coping skills.

What would be your next question, and why?

I would ask the client about the possibility of having a family session which could be beneficial by making the people involved understand themselves more. It is important for the therapist to remain neutral and validate each family member`s feeling with the goal to improve communication among them and enable the therapist to develop an appropriate care plan for the client (Renee, & Ballas, 2018). Lastly, the next question would have been the practitioner to find out if the client is using drugs or having any suicidal or homicidal thoughts.

References

Lok, N., Bademli, K. (2018). The effects of anger management education on adolescents’ manner of displaying anger and self-esteem: A randomized controlled trial. Archives of Psychiatric Nursing. 32(1), p. 75-81.

Price, B. (2017). Developing patient rapport, trust, and therapeutic relationships. Nursing Standard. 31(50), p. 52-65.

Renee, W., & Ballas, P. (2018). Comprehensive Psychiatric Evaluation for Children. N.p.: University of Rochester Medical Center. Retrieved from https://www.urmc.rochester.edu/encyclopedia/content.aspx?ContentTypeID=90&ContentID=P02564