In this Discussion, you explore the many accrediting bodies and regulatory agencies that accredit and certify academic and clinical settings.

accrediting Bodies and Regulatory Agencies

Like a firework spreading out over the night sky, the history of accreditation overarches much of health care’s past. In the late 1800s, the emphasis on health care practices, procedures, and expectations was much like a fuse that propels a firework into the air. Uniformity of high quality standards was the new goal to reach. As this new goal ignited however, many different organizations and committees began to form, each branching out in its own direction. One association, the American Society of Superintendents of Training Schools of Nursing, pushed to equalize and elevate standards across all schools of nursing. Today, this association is known as the National League for Nursing (NLN), a specialized accrediting body for nursing programs. In 1913, another association, the American College of Surgeons (ACS), began to conduct on-site inspections of hospitals. Out of the 692 hospitals they visited, only 89 met their minimum quality standards. Like the NLN, the ACS continued to grow, later merging with what is known today as the Joint Commission.

In this Discussion, you explore the many accrediting bodies and regulatory agencies that accredit and certify academic and clinical settings.