5-Oh, how I love this question. When I first started college as a teenager, I found my calling toward my journey as becoming a nurse. I was so scared to do this because I knew that I would be responsible for others’ lives.

5-Oh, how I love this question. When I first started college as a teenager, I found my calling toward my journey as becoming a nurse. I was so scared to do this because I knew that I would be responsible for others’ lives. When I began this journey, I always knew that my end-goal was to do something in primary care. This is because I feel that the United States, in general, can be more about fixing problems that have happened rather than preventing them from starting in the first place. This applies to the entire medical field as well. I have worked for two completely separate health care facilities, a private/non-profit hospital, and a government-run VA hospital. These are two completely different worlds of health care, but they have been going in the same direction: primary care. Both health care networks have branched out, from having only hospitals, to also building several Community Based Outpatient Clinics (CBOCs). Health care networks are finally realizing that prevention is the key to good health, not fixing health problems that have already occurred. I love to educate patients and cannot wait to someday finally get to my goal position in community health so that I can educate and give appropriate resources to better the health of our patients. In hospital facilities, we have nurse educators, but, as I have seen, they are not readily available when patients need them the most or are not being utilized enough. Nurses working on the floor are simply overworked and do not have the time to sit and educate patients appropriately, especially since education is supposed to start the moment the patient comes through the hospital doors until discharge. Also, some nurses may have time but others do not and so the education is not consistent. I am huge on diabetic education as I believe that this is one of our biggest health problems and will become worse as people continue eating the way they do (and not exercising). In fact, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), more than 30 million people in the United States have diabetes, which is one out of ten people (2017). Also, more than 84 million people have prediabetes (CDC, 2017)! I could go on and on with this topic though as there are so many crazy facts about diabetes. The point is that eating right, staying active, and losing weight can be detrimental to a person’s health and the facts are being proven over and over again. It is our job, as nurses, to be able to help so many people make their lives better through educating them and giving them these blunt facts so that they can make informed decisions about their health.