Nurses have key roles in working with family caregivers who are actual or potential perpetrators of elder abuse.

  • “Facilitation of referrals for comprehensive and interdisciplinary assessment
  • Interventions to address functional limitations (e.g., making suggestions about assistive devices, facilitating referrals for rehabilitation therapists)
  • Interventions to improve management of chronic conditions (e.g., medication management strategies, education about self-care)
  • Assessment and interventions related to risks for falls and other safety concerns
  • Facilitation of appropriate and acceptable support services (e.g., home-delivered meals, personal care assistance)” (Miller).

The second one I see often is neglect by a trusted other, why it is crucial: “Neglect by trusted others can be intentional, unintentional, or both, depending on factors such as motivation, knowledge, and skill level of the responsible person. Also, neglect may evolve gradually as the health and functional levels of the caregiver or the dependent older adult change. For example, caregivers may initially be well intentioned and provide good care, but become overwhelmed or lack the skills as the needs of the care recipient increase. Other times, caregivers may experience functional or cognitive impairments and not only become incapable of providing care to others but also be in a position of needing care for themselves” ( Miller).

How I could advocate and protect them from neglect from a trusted other:

  • “These situations often involve a combination of acute and chronic risk factors that can be addressed by health care professionals.
  • Nurses are in key positions to identify risks for actual or potential domestic elder abuse.
  • Nurses have key roles in working with family caregivers who are actual or potential perpetrators of elder abuse.
  • Nursing interventions such as caregiver education or referrals to appropriate resources may be effective in preventing or resolving some situations of domestic elder abuse” (Miller).